Guy playing guitar fingerpicking style

Cool Guitar Fingerpicking Songs

Fingerpicking invokes a different sort of guitar player inside when compared to using a pick. There’s a sense of connection to the instrument that you just don’t get with a pick, and it inspires a different rhythm and feel to playing.

The Animals playing The House of the Rising Sun Photographer: F. van Geelen, CC BY-SA 3.0 NL, via Wikimedia Commons
Guy playing solo using guitar scales

7 Pentatonic Scale Exercises to Master the Box Shapes

The pentatonic scale may be the most versatile scale in music. If there’s one scale guitar players must master, this is the one. In this lesson we’re going to look at some pentatonic scale exercises to help you thoroughly learn the scale patterns and play through them fluidly with flawless technique.

Guy playing a guitar solo in a band setting

Soloing Over Chord Changes

There are many ways to go about soloing over chord changes, but it essentially comes down to outlining the chords in the progression to highlight the changes. In this lesson we’ll take a look at some simple options for playing over chord changes that work in a writing setting as well as for improvisation.

Pearl Jam playing live at Madison Square Garden tammylo, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons
Guy playing scale exercises on the guitar
Guitar with notebook of chords and lyrics

Basics of Guitar Modes

Guitar modes can be a confusing topic. In this lesson we’ll take a simplified look at the major scale modes and see if we can bring some clarity to the concept.

Guy playing arpeggios on guitar

Arpeggio Exercises for Guitar

Arpeggios are great tools to be used in music, but they can take a little time to get under your fingers. In this lesson, we’ll take a look at a few approaches to practicing arpeggios that not only build technique, but also improve musicality and overall knowledge of the fretboard.

Positional playing on guitar

Positional Playing on Guitar

As guitarists, once we learn the pentatonic boxes we seem to immediately strive to get “out of the box” and extend our playing up and down the fretboard. However, what if instead of trying to get out of the box, we seek to maximize what each box position has to offer?